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Image from page 100 of "Journeys through Bookland : a new and original plan for reading applied to the world's best literature for children" (1922) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 100 of "Journeys through Bookland : a new and original plan for reading applied to the world's best literature for children" (1922)

Identifier: journeysthroughb01sylv

Title: Journeys through Bookland : a new and original plan for reading applied to the world's best literature for children

Year: 1922 (1920s)

Authors: Sylvester, Charles Herbert

Subjects: Children's literature

Publisher: Chicago : Bellows-Reeve

Contributing Library: Internet Archive

Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

  

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together a bundle of as many sticks as therewere sons. Then when all were present he said tothe youngest, Take this bundle of sticks and breakit. Though the youngest tried his best he could notbreak the bundle, nor could the next boy, nor thenext, nor even the oldest and strongest of them,although he put his knee across it and pulled withall his muscles. When each son had made trial and all had failed,the father cut the cord that bound the sticks togetherand handed a single stick to each son. Now break them, said he. Each son succeeded in breaking his stick withgreat ease. See, my sons! cried the old man. There isthe power of unitjM Bound together in brotherlylove, you may defy every human opposition; divided,you will surely fall a prey to your enemies. Little Red Riding Hood 79 LITTLE RED RIDING-IIOOD Adapted from the French ofCharles Perrault ONCE upon a time there lived in a small villagein the country a little girl, the prettiest andsweetest little creature that ever was seen. Her

 

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RED RIDING HOOD AND THE WOLF 80 Little Red Riding Hood mother loved her very fondly, and her grandmotherdoted on her still more. This good woman had made for her a little redhood, which was so becoming to the child that everyone called her Little Red Riding-Hood. One day her mother, having made some cheesecakes, said to her: Go, my child, and see how your grandmotherdoes; for I fear she is ill. Carry her some of thesecakes and this little pat of butter. Little Red Riding-Hood set out right away witha basket filled with cakes and the pat of butter, togo to her grandmothers house, which was in anothervillage a little way off. As she was going through a wood which lay inher road, she met a large wolf, who had a very greatmind to eat her up; but he dared not, because ofsome woodcutters near by in the forest. Yet hespoke to her and asked her where she was going. The poor child, who did not know that it is alwaysdangerous to stand and hear a wolf talk, said to him: I am going to see my gran

  

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Taken circa 1922