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Image from page 238 of "John Bull & co.; the great colonial branches of the firm: Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa" (1894) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 238 of "John Bull & co.; the great colonial branches of the firm: Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa" (1894)

Identifier: johnbullcogreatc00orel

Title: John Bull & co.; the great colonial branches of the firm: Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa

Year: 1894 (1890s)

Authors: O'Rell, Max, 1848-1903

Subjects:

Publisher: New York, C. L. Webster & company

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

PAIKIA.[Fro7n a Photograph by FoY Brothers, Thames, Neza Zealand.] of them go so far as to have their backs tattooed, so asto be fascinating in the water when they swim ; and Ione day had as much as I could do to persuade a Ma- JOHN BULL & CO. 229 ori belle that on this subject her word was quite suffi-cient for me. With the men, tattooing has long been out of fashion,but among the older Maoris I saw marvelous exam-ples of the practice. The forehead, nose, and cheeksare covered with a freehand design in dark blue, mak-ing the face repulsive but picturesque.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

MAORI GREETING—RUBBING NOSES.\_Frofn a Photograph by Burton Bros., Dunedin, Nezu Zealand.^ The Maori men are Grands Seigjtetirs, who maketheir women wait upon them, but who never ill-treatthem. They adore children, and make excellentfathers. When two Maoris meet, they are quietly demonstra-tive in their greetings. They press each others hands. 230 JOHN BULL & CO. and remain, while one might count twenty, nose laidagainst nose, without movement, without speech—afew instants of mute exultation, of friendly ecstasy. Their language is the softest in the world. Likethose of the Samoans and Hawaiians, it contains, I amtold, only thirteen letters. It is K, P, L,.N that youseem to hear all the time. Here is some Maori; it isthe notice posted in all the New Zealand railway sta-tions : Kaua e Kai paipa Ki Konei (Smoking is Pro-hibited). It has very much the sound of Greek, has itnot? The volubility of the women is prodigious. It is atorrent, an avalanche of words. There are talkativewom

  

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Taken circa 1894