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Image from page 119 of "The story of the marches, battles, and incidents of the Third United States Colored Cavalry; a fighting regiment in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-5" (1908) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 119 of "The story of the marches, battles, and incidents of the Third United States Colored Cavalry; a fighting regiment in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-5" (1908)

Identifier: storyofmarchesba01main

Title: The story of the marches, battles, and incidents of the Third United States Colored Cavalry; a fighting regiment in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-5

Year: 1908 (1900s)

Authors: Main, Edwin M., 1837-

Subjects: United States. Army. 3d Cavalry (Colored) United States -- History Civil War, 1861-1865 Regimental histories United States 3d Cavalry (Colored)

Publisher: Louisville, Ky., Globe Print. Co.

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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dended in the entire discomfiture of the rebels. Intense darkness prevented pursuit, and when daylight cameit was found the rebels, after iregaining their horses, had dis-persed through the woods, each man running on his own account.Ten dead of the enemy were found,, and numbers were seenhelped upon horses, and thus carried away. The enemy having dispersed, no pursuit could be made, andthe number of wounded necessitated the return to camp, whichwas reached at 10 a. m. to-day. Two men too severely hurt to travel were left a few milesfrom here with surgeon until sufficiently recovered to permit their removal. Horses and mules were captured, enough to cover our lossof stock, although the quality is not as good as onr own. Too much credit cannot be given the Fourth IlHnois Cavalry,who did all that men could do under the circumstances. Sur-prised, they fought hand to hand, and those who were takenprisoners wene bodily carried away. The conduct of the First iMississippi Cavalry, A. D. could

 

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VAPT. RICHARDlTAYUOk,Third U. S. C. C. Third U. S. Colored Cavalry. 91 not have been excelled by veterans, WOunded men refusing togo to the rear. It was the first figiht for most of them, but, in the languageof Major Cook, their commanding officer, I could have heldthem till the last man was shot. I inclose a rough sketch of the country, also list of ourlosses, which, owing to our men being by the side of camp-fires, were mecessarily severe. I am, Colonel, respectfully, Your obedient servant, E. D. OSBAND, Col. First Mississippi Cavalry, A. D.Commandin2: Post. LIEUTENANT-COLONEL WILLIAM T. CLARK, ASST. ADJUTANT-GENERAL, 17th ARMY CORPS. While Colonel Osbands report is correct in the main, he errsin some of the details, viz.: He places the strength of the enemy at 140, when it shouldbe 500, this fact being subsequiently ascertained. Speaking of the enemys loss the report says, Numbers wereseen helped or thrown upon horses, and thus carried away,when the fact is the rebels had no horses

  

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Taken circa 1908