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Image from page 458 of "History of the Army of the Cumberland : its organization, campaigns, and battles, written at the request of Major-General George H. Thomas chiefly from his private military journal and official and other documents furnished by him" | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 458 of "History of the Army of the Cumberland : its organization, campaigns, and battles, written at the request of Major-General George H. Thomas chiefly from his private military journal and official and other documents furnished by him"

Identifier: historyofarmyofc02vanh

Title: History of the Army of the Cumberland : its organization, campaigns, and battles, written at the request of Major-General George H. Thomas chiefly from his private military journal and official and other documents furnished by him

Year: 1875 (1870s)

Authors: Van Horne, Thomas B. (Thomas Budd), d. 1895 Ruger, Edward

Subjects: United States. Army of the Cumberland United States -- History Civil War, 1861-1865 Regimental histories

Publisher: Cincinnati : R. Clarke & Co.

Contributing Library: New York Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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lock-house. An upper story (not shown in the .figure), resting diagonally onthe corners of the inner square, was added to the west block-house as quarters for the garrison. To avoid an excess ofweight, this story was only made musketry-proof. On top ofall was a small lookout. The construction of these block-houses reflected great credit upon the Michigan Engineers bywhom they were built. An artillery block-house was alsocommenced in 1865, at Larkinsville, Alabama, but it was nevercompleted. It was intended to answer as a fort for the gar-rison at this important point, which was much exposed toattack from the south side of the Tennessee. It is proper toadd that my first idea of building a block-house for artillerycame from seeing a rude, half-finished work of this kind,which was begun by the Confederates in 1863, at StrawberryPlains, above Knoxville. An artillery block-house is difficult and costly to build, andis only justifiable in very exceptionable localities. I think APPENDIX. 447

 

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Fig. 7. Plan of Artillery Block-house. that Bridgeport was such a locality, as the vital importanceto the army of the two long hridges over the Tennessee calledfor defense by artillery, as well on the island as on the mainland, and the latter so thoroughly commanded the island thatartillery could only remain on it while thoroughly under cover.It may be well to mention that an artillery block-house aftermy designs was built in 1864, near Alexandria, Virginia, toprotect from cavalry raids down the valley of Hunting creek.The enemy soon found that our block-houses were proofagainst any Ordinary attack, and small bodies never molestedthem. Injury to the track of the railroad was repaired almostas soon as made, and after a while such annoyances ceased.The only serious assaults received by our block-houses wereas follows; 448 APPENDIX. In August, 1864, General Wheeler, with a division ofcavalry, left Atlanta, traveled north to near Knoxville,thence west to near Nashville, thence southwest t

  

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Taken circa 1875