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This group discussion is for members only.

Group Description

This group is for photographs of rare birds that have been submitted to eBird (ebird.org). See below for a description of eBird.

The purpose of this group is to document observations of birds made outside of that species normal range or normal seasonal occurrence. By including images here, your photographs will be available to the wide audience of eBird and Flickr users.

For inclusion images must meet the following criteria:
1. Observations must be submitted to eBird.
2. Photographs must be labeled with the species name, location, date and photographer's name. We recommend using tags to do this.
3. Additional information on identification is also welcome.
4. Images should be of birds made outside their normal range, outside their normal seasonal timing, or to document exceptional concentrations of a single species.
5. Please include no more than 2-4 photos per bird, add the URL for the eBird checklist in the photo description, and embed the photo in the checklist comments in eBird (ebird.org/content/ebird/about/embedding_richmedia)

What is eBird?— Launched in 2002 by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and National Audubon Society, eBird’s goal is to maximize the utility and accessibility of the vast numbers of bird observations made each year by recreational and professional bird watchers. A web-based bird checklist program, eBird is amassing one of the largest and fastest growing biodiversity data resources in existence. For example, in 2006 over 4.3 million bird observations were gathered. The observations of each participant join those of others in an international network of eBird users. eBird then shares these observations with a global community of educators, land managers, ornithologists and conservation biologists. In time these data will become the foundation for a better understanding of bird distribution across the western hemisphere and beyond.

How does it work?— eBird documents the presence or absence of species, as well as bird abundance through checklist data. A simple and intuitive web-interface engages tens of thousands of participants to submit their observations or view results via interactive queries into the eBird database. eBird encourages users to participate by providing Internet tools that maintain their personal bird records, and ways to visualize data with interactive maps, graphs, and bar charts. All these features are available in several languages (English, Spanish, and French).

A birder simply enters when, where and how they went birding, and then fills out a checklist of all the birds seen and heard during the outing. eBird provides alternative methodologies for data gathering including point counts, transects and area searches. Automated data quality filters developed by regional bird experts review all submissions before they enter the database. Local experts review unusual records that are flagged by the filters.

Data integration— eBird collects observations from birders through portals managed and maintained by local partner conservation organizations. In this way eBird targets specific audiences with the highest level of local expertise, promotion, and project ownership. Portals may have a regional focus (aVerAves, eBird Puerto Rico) or they may have more specific goals and/or specific methodologies (Louisiana Winter Bird Atlas, Bird Conservation Network eBird). Each eBird portal is fully integrated within the eBird database and application infrastructure so that data can be analyzed across political and geographic boundaries. For example, observers entering observations of Cape May Warbler from Puerto Rico can view those data separately, or with the entire Cape May Warbler data set gathered by eBird across the western hemisphere.

Data accessibility—While eBird data are stored in a secure facility and archived daily, the data are also accessible to anyone via applications developed by the global biodiversity information community. For example, eBird data are part of the Avian Knowledge Network (AKN), which integrates observational data on bird populations across the western hemisphere. In turn, the AKN feeds eBird data to international biodiversity data systems, such as the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). In this way any contribution made to eBird increases our understanding of the distribution, richness, and uniqueness of the biodiversity of our planet.

Group Rules

This group is for photographs of rare birds that have been submitted to eBird (ebird.org).

The purpose of this group is to document observations of birds made outside of that species' normal range or normal seasonal occurrence that have been entered into eBird. By including images here, your photographs will be available to the wide audience of eBird and Flickr users, as well as to our eBird Reviewers. These images will also cycle through on the eBird home page.

For inclusion images must meet the following criteria:

1. Observations must be submitted to eBird.

2. The record MUST have been flagged by the relevant eBird filter as outside normal occurrence parameters.

3. Photographs must be labeled with the species name, location (including state/province and county, if relevant), date, and photographer's name. In some cases metadata will already include some of these pieces of information. If so, you do not need to repeat them.

4. Please include no more than 2-4 photos per bird. To share your additional photos, we recommend you embed them in a comment [www.flickr.com/help/video/#2205] and/or include a link to a set containing additional photos.

5. Please include the URL for the eBird checklist in the photo description. Simply copy the URL after you've submitted the checklist. Here's an example: (www.flickr.com/photos/pauljhurtado/8205062086/).

6. Embedding the photo in checklist comment is *tremendously* helpful for eBird reviewers and will ensure that your photo-documented record is validated quickly in eBird. Learn how here [ebird.org/content/ebird/about/embedding_richmedia]

7. The eBird Rarity pool and eBird review process depend upon the ability to take bird documentation seriously and to discuss the identification of photos in a respectful and civil manner. Please keep this in mind, understand that we all care about providing quality data to eBird, and keep the discourse positive.

Each rare bird record submitted to eBird is reviewed by a team of expert reviewers. It will make their job much easier if you upload photos here and use the "species comments" field in eBird to say that a photo has been uploaded to the eBird Rarities Group.

Additional Info

  • This group will count toward the photo's limit (60 for Pro members, 30 for free members)
  • Accepted content types: Photos, Videos, Images
  • Accepted safety levels: Safe
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