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NormanKlipspringer 1:07pm, 11 August 2010
I have posted a series of photos to the group showing Klipspringer as is before I do much work on her. All the photos are in a set within my photostream and labelled Klipspringer. I will continue to take photos as the work progresses. I intend to do much less work than I thought originally. I will get her in the water and take it from there. Waiting for a hip operation in Autumn meanms that my ability to do the work is limited so this is affecting my decision.
pjbharrison 8 years ago
Good luck with the hip operation, Norman.
You'll have a busy off season tidying the boat and fitting her out as you want. She looks like a good sound boat. Enjoy
jendave1 8 years ago
We also wish you luck with the operation. Is the plan to get her into the water next year, or are you going to 'go for it' and sort things out as they arise?
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NormanKlipspringer 8 years ago
Thanks for the good wishes. I am doing what I can when I can. Getting the boatyard to help with bits of GRP work. Present task is the wiring. Most of it seems very good. I always wanted a nine switch panel in Archimedes. Now I have one on Klipspringer and it all seems to work fine. I want to reposition the chartplotter from outside on the starboard cockpit bulkhead and the radio from one of the cubby holes in the main cabin on port side. Both these to go onto a swinging mount which I intend to be able to swing out and lock in position in the companion way in such a way that I can use a tranparent washbaord when battened down and still see them. Also the radio will be easy to use when single handed in the cockpit from on deck. When swung back they will be viewable from the inside of the cabin. When I have done this I will post pictures.
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NormanKlipspringer 8 years ago
The rot found in the bulkhead between the Lazzerette and cockpit lockers is now repaired. I have looked at Archimedes and the plyboard is sound. I would suggest you all check yours since Klipspringer was bad. More rot found in the timber surrounding the sink unit. I have uploaded some pics.
Klipspringer refit 006
Klipspringer refit 003
Klipspringer refit 002
Klipspringer refit 004

I have therefore decided to go back to Plan A and remove all the sink unit so that I can extend the seat. this will make it much easier to slepp on and is a waste of space simply for a sink. I plan to use a loose bowl under the cooker.
Gradually sorting out the wiring but this will take a bit longer. Found the turning blocks at the base of the mast were seized but have with a bit of persuasion managed to totally free one and partially free the others.
nigelw2010 8 years ago
Hi Norm, just seen the photos, I see what you mean. Plan A then. Probably better for you.
jendave1 8 years ago
I agree a longer bunk would be more use than the sink unit. Also like the instrument idea with the transparent wash-board, good thinking there!
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NormanKlipspringer Posted 8 years ago. Edited by NormanKlipspringer (admin) 8 years ago
Had the tiller headstock repaired. See the photo below:
Klipspringer tiller
The weld was done while I waited and I was charged £5. Old tumble down workshop in the middle of Carmarthenshire, but is fantastic at welding.
I am well pleased.
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NormanKlipspringer 8 years ago
Found that the major part of the rot adjacent to the washup area was from a leak. It appears to come from cracked GRP inside the stanchion. There are also some small cracks on the outside. Doesn't look difficult to repair.
Sink unit removed today. Confirms my impression of space that I had when I saw Goskar (Ron's boat).
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NormanKlipspringer 8 years ago
Just getting back to thinking about the necessary work. First draft of jobs to do has 44 jobs. I am sure it will expand beyond this.
Xantho582 8 years ago
Hi Norman,

Good luck with the refit, im in the process of getting ready for my refurb, hopefully starting it this weekend.
I have just been looking through some older photos on the site and have seen Rons (superb) refit, and see that you too are making a longer berth by removing the sink. being a gangly 6 foot 2 im thinking of going this route myself. Have you any photos of Klipspringer with the sink removed? I assume its a case of using a jigsaw to cut away the moulded GRP unit then using timber to extend the berth??

Tony
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NormanKlipspringer 8 years ago
Tony,
I haven't any photos but I will take some if I remember next time I am able to get on the boat, which will not be too long now. It was Ron's work on Goskar that made me think of doing the work on klipspringer and when I discivered the rot in the small bulkhead that made my mind up. The difference is quite remarkable.
I did'nt do the work myself, but had my local boat yard to help. I still have some finishing off to do. For added strength the top of the seat has been glassed in permantently and I intend to cut down the old cupboard door to make a small door for the new cupboard. My installation was complicated by the existance of a skin fitting for sink drainage, which since it is above the waterline and would be difficult to glass in without exensive paintwork repair on the outside, I have decied to keep in place and just plug and fill. It will then be covered by the seat cushion.
Scott and Portia1386 8 years ago
Tony
Danny’s Boat the May has the extended seats in place of the sink I think this is an original feature. I am sure he has pictures of her on his site it may be worth a look at Dan @ co.
Scott
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NormanKlipspringer 8 years ago
Picture of May with extended seat:
www.flickr.com/photos/36244074@N07/3597341611/in/set-7215...
Exactly what I have on Klipspringer but yet to get the cushions sorted.
I am not sure that this was ever an original feature on the Achilles 24. Certainly that is the impression I got from Chris Butler when I discussed the issue with him.
Scott and Portia1386 Posted 8 years ago. Edited by Scott and Portia1386 (member) 8 years ago
Sorry for any misconception what I meant was that the way it looks would suggest it was done when the May was new maybe she is a home finished boat. If not the work must have been done some time ago. Scott
songeur2010 8 years ago
Songeur has had three variations to the sink seat area. I was able to see where the original sink unit had been but when I got her she had a small chart table where the sink would have been. I cut the table out and extended the seat the same as Norman, it makes a big difference to the internal seating / sleeping and has made extra storage under the new seat and in the rear of the berth.
The entire fit-out inside Songeur is ply, no fiberglass mouldings at all, it would appear these were removed some time ago, it does make it easier to alter if easy is the correct word to use in the small space available.
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NormanKlipspringer 8 years ago
Really getting to grips with Klipspringer (been inspired by Farmer Boy). Currently getting to grips with the electrics. Rewired tiller pilot. Rewired for two batteries with changeover switch. Bought fishfinder and am installing this with my Garmin GPSMAP450 which came with the boat, my handheld Garmin GPS 76cx, my DSC radio and a clock on an instrument panel which will be located in the companionway behind a transparent washboard if necessary,when in use and will swing back out of the way to give access to the cabin. I have ordered a new mainsail from Crusader (cruiser, cut for rolling round the boom but also with two rows of reefing cringles and clew and tack cunninghams. Two Spinlock jammars as on Archimedes are on their way plus a host of other snaller items. Money is pouring out!! I will take pictures as I go along. I have discovered that existing cushions fit the extended seat in the cabin. Using the existing long cushion plus the short cushion from the other side. Great I don't have to spend money on these. I have leaks to cure, most of which I think are in the jenny tracks and numerous other tasks.
pjbharrison 8 years ago
Glad to hear your hip is feeling up to the work, Noman. Started to do a bit today myself. Serviced a 1959 Seagull engine, runs like a dream now!
Snow Goose Tim 8 years ago
I have an old sea bee engine, i was going to chuck it but it looks like it may be quite desirable. I know nothing about old engines have you ever heard of these?

Im looking forward to seeing your retractable instrument panel Norman, cockpit space is something I have been pondering over! sounds like a good Idea
pjbharrison 8 years ago
Snow Goose Tim
Have a look at
www.saving-old-seagulls.co.uk/
John, the site owner, is very helpful by email. He has all the spares and info you'll need.
Snow Goose Tim 8 years ago
looks like a great site thanks for the tip
pjbharrison 8 years ago
rothwell_neil 8 years ago
If you read John Guzzwell and Trekka around the world he often mentions pulling a rusty outboard out of the locker and it running despite all comments from on lookers. Keeps mentioning that it can live in a locker for months and start once primed. He agreed with the claim painted on it 'the best outboard for the world'. I love my seagull 40minus, not as light as the Johnson, probably not as powerful, smellier, but it has a certain charm and the noise makes a remote anchorage special! Also never seems to let you down, whereas when the Johnson threw the starter spring was a major overhaul to repair it with no option for alternative starting mechanism. There is one down side to the seagull, in wet weather you get a bit of the spark travelling down the tiller if you don't hold the rubber end!
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NormanKlipspringer 8 years ago
Managed to free the turning blocks at the base of the mast by drilling out the existing swagged pins. Stainless so need a good sharp bit. Cleaned all the parts and reassembled with clevis pins. Job done. Currently resealing the jenny tracks, which turned out to be a bigger job than expected. The nuts for the aft 3 bolts were encapsulated in GRP and and to find this out I had to remove the quarter berth headlining. I have now got the starboard track off and cleaned ready to go back on. Hope to do this today. Other jobs on hold for the time being, since I am making use of the good weather to reseal fitings etc.
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NormanKlipspringer Posted 8 years ago. Edited by NormanKlipspringer (admin) 8 years ago
Port track came off yesterday, but had a bit of difficulty with the encapsulated nuts which were not held by the GRP so I hade to dig out the GRP to get at them, After this job went ok. Definately need two people. I vae also Started to reseal the shroud ubolts some of which were letting it a lot of water.
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NormanKlipspringer 8 years ago
Finished shrouds. Ended up reinforcing port side with stainless strip and bedding in GRP chopped strand to spread load. Starboard had already been done.
Forestay attachment point to deck proved a bigger job than anticipated. The old u-bolt was bent and this together with the galvanised steel strip which is bent forwrad of the u-bolt had allowed the deck to move slightly and produce some hairline cracks around the aft ubolt thread.
Klipspringer refit forstay reinforcement (6)
It wasn't going anywhere but I was not happy so decided to do something. My idea previously mentioned above of reinforcing through to the bow, I decided was going to be very difficult given the access problems, so I decided to adopt a different approach and reinforce to the deck and deck sides.
I took off the old u-bolt and plyboard packer and wire brushed and painted the galvanised support strip with white Hammerite.
Klipspringer refit forstay reinforcement (5)
I then prepared a kit of parts:
Klipspringer refit forstay reinforcement (2)
Packers out of nylon to spread the load. Stainless strips to trap the galvanised strip and bind the packers and spread the load to the deck and decksides.
I assembled the packers first and glued them to each other and to the deck with Balcotan glue which foams and fills any voids. I also bedded the stainless to the deck sides with GRP chopped strand and of course i used Silcoflex to seal the u-bolt to the deck.
Klipspringer refit forstay reinforcement (11)
In the picture the packers are not quite straight but they are doing the job and the whole lot will not go anywhere.
I have also put on new Spinlock jammers as on Archimedes except That I have gone for 3 and 3. New fairleads on the stern and am now in the process of installing my swinging instrument box mentioned above. Seams bigger than I thought it would be but I don't really see the alternatives. Pictures to follow.
Feels as though I am getting somewhere at last.
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NormanKlipspringer Posted 8 years ago. Edited by NormanKlipspringer (admin) 8 years ago
Have finally got round to installing the instruments. Pictures below show the installation. The box swings back out of the way.
Instruments 1

Instruments 2

I will have to take some more photos to show the mounting etc.
rothwell_neil 8 years ago
Like the flight deck of a Eurofighter.
jendave1 8 years ago
Very nice work!
busy home [deleted] 8 years ago
Wheres the tele?
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NormanKlipspringer Posted 8 years ago. Edited by NormanKlipspringer (admin) 8 years ago
Thanks for the nice comments and the sarcasm. I got it all working yesterday. First time ever that I have managed to get a DSC radio and chartplotter to talk on NMEA first time. I was interested to see what would happen if I connected both chartplotters at the same time on NMEA to the DSC radio. The Gramin 450 won - I can only assume that the sibnal is stronger. Perhaps someone can explain. When the 450 is switched off the GPSMap 76cx takes over seamlessly - very pleased. I have yet to connect my tiller pilot to the NMEA as I have on Archimedes. Wiring is all there ready to go - my next job. I have also to install the fishfinder transducer inside the hull in Silcaflex.
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NormanKlipspringer 8 years ago
Making progress with my instrument box. Although not quite the finished article I have uploaded some photos for you to see how it fits together.
the first picture below shows the extent of the intrusion into the cabin, but all the instruments are usable from the cabin, and although there is some obstruction to getting in/out it is not a problem.
Instrument box swing back into cabin
The second picture below shows the three solid brass hinges for support. Wiring will eventually be enclosed in wiring loom (plastic spiral).
Instrument box hinge
Not quite the finished article but the basics are in place. Note the brass hook to hold the box in the open position.
Rear of instrument box
The forth picture below shows the instrument box supporting bracket. Made from mahoganny. Quite difficult to get the angles just right
Instrument box supporting bracket.
Beginning to start work on the outside - cleaning, sanding,staining, antifouling.
RRatCalypso 8 years ago
Norman, nice job. I feel sorry for you doing the outside ... re sanding and antifouling. I am on my second gallon of stripper, and wirh I had a second pair of arms.
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NormanKlipspringer 8 years ago
T cut the hull. Came up reasonable. Some acceptable marks for 30yr old boat. Put new names on Klipspringer prior to polishing. danded the rubbing strakes and noticed that there is a gap along most of its length so I intend to use white Silcaflex along the underside to seal and then run some Balkotan 60100 in the top having masked with tape ro prevent the glue from going onto the rubbing strake and antislip surface of the hull. The Balkotan will foam to fill the void and the excess cut away. Could not face rubbing down the hull yesterday so went sailing in Archimedes. Great sailing for a few hours. Each time I go out I wonder if this will be my last sail in her?
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NormanKlipspringer 7 years ago
Definately had my last sail in Archimedes. Mast came down today ready for taking out and swapping with Klipspringer. Touch of sadness, been 5years of real pleasure. Hope the new owner will enjoy her as much as I have. Advert for Archimedes will be on next update of main site in a few days time. On Klipspringer I have rubbed down all the external woodwork and begun sorting out the inside. Hope to launch within 2 weeks.
pjbharrison 7 years ago
I expect the mixed feelings will pass once you've completed the refit and had your first sail.
Good luck with the sale.
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NormanKlipspringer 7 years ago
Thanks Paul
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NormanKlipspringer 7 years ago
Mast came down on Klipspringer today. I tried my Genoa from Archimedes on Klipspringer before the mast was lowered. Found that that the halyard could not be fully tightened. The luff is too long. the roller reefing drum is much higher, above the bottle screw. I will see if I can get the sail altered since it is virtually new and I was hoping to use it. Almost finished the woodwork. Hope to launch on weekend of 11/12 June.
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NormanKlipspringer 7 years ago
Fitted new VHF aerial yesterday. Thought installing the new cable would be relatively easy - attach new to old and pull. Unfortunately I think the old cable had been taped tied to the power cables going up the mast so no way could it be pulled through. Had to resort to using fence wire in two sections. Top of mast to spreaders and spreaders to step. It took some time but eventually it was ok. The old aerial was broken at the base so allowing water to enter - no wonder it failed to work. Today I have to finish the installation by connecting the plug to the end for the through deck gland. Also installing a steaming light and radar reflector.
busy home [deleted] 7 years ago
Nearly there Norm ,,, All the best..
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NormanKlipspringer 7 years ago
Thanks Ron. Old cables and deck gland useless so will have to rewire. I am not bothering with the anchor light at the top of the mast. I will use an LED lantern hung from the boom.
New aerial works even at a horizontal angle. Tried polishing the hull, which has come up ok but with some blooming in patches mostly near the water line. I can live with this.
rothwell_neil 7 years ago
Norman

Farmer John helped me and we got the mast down, new LEDS for anchor and Tricolour, mast back up, new waterproof connector, Tricolour looks good, despite testing whist down, anchor light doesn't work. Nice LED slung over the boom or strapped to pole in ensign hole for rest of this season! Will be fine.
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NormanKlipspringer 7 years ago
Hull after polish.
Hull 2
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NormanKlipspringer Posted 7 years ago. Edited by NormanKlipspringer (admin) 7 years ago
Compare above photo with the one below taken by Ron just before I purchased the boat.
Klipspringer at purchase
It is only when you look at before and after that you can appreciate the difference.
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NormanKlipspringer Posted 7 years ago. Edited by NormanKlipspringer (admin) 7 years ago
At last the launch - swapping with Archimedes.
K ready for launch:
Klipspringer awaiting the truck
K with me on board ready for truck:
Klipspringer with me on board
Final touches:
Klipspringer on its way
On the slip into the marina:
Klipspringer - approaching crunch time
Touching water:
Klipspringer touching water
On a pontoon with mast up courtesy of hyab:
Klipspringer on the pontoon
On the pontoon with Archimedes in the background
klipspringer - at last in the water
Archimedes waiting patiently:
Archimedes awaiting the lift
Archimedes the lift out:
Archimedes the lift out
Archimedes out of the water. Not bad for over 2 years use. No barnicles except on prop.
Archimedes - on the way out
Archimedes leaving the marina:
Archimedes
Am I glad that is over. Still plenty of work but hopefully will be sailing in Klipspringer soon.
jendave1 7 years ago
Must have been a nerve racking day - it's bad enough just getting one boat lifted in let alone another coming out. Sounds like all went well though, congratulations!
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NormanKlipspringer 7 years ago
Thanks to Ron's help I have sorted out the broken spreader end fitting and today (before the rain came) I was setting up the mast and rigging. I went for about 11% of breaking strain for the shrouds for the first attempt. I also guessed at the mast rake. I did tie a heavy weight to the main sail halyard but the wind was blowing a bit, but I think the rake is about 6" from the halyard to the base of the mast. I will see how this performs and adjust as necessary. Boom and sail will be next. Still have some leaks to sort out .
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NormanKlipspringer 7 years ago
Archimedes hull has cleaned up well after power washing and using Harpic power plus above the waterline.
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NormanKlipspringer Posted 7 years ago. Edited by NormanKlipspringer (admin) 7 years ago
First sail in Klipspringer today. Somehow it feels the same as Archimedes but different. New Crusader main looks good. Yesterday was almost my first sail, but I had to abandon once I discovered a seacock which failed to shut on the toilet exit. I have decided to leave it for now and sort out when out of the water next. I have suitably bunged up the pipe. Still much work to complete the refit, but at least she is useable at long last.
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NormanKlipspringer 7 years ago
Out again on Klipspringer. Great winds fantastic speed - max 7.3 knots over the ground on slack water. What it is to have a clean bottom. When I set up the mast I marginally reduced the rake from Archimdes to reduce weather helm and this seams to work. Much easier to balance the boat. I couldn't get at the forestay bottlescrew on Archimedes since it was covered by the roller reefing. This is not the case on Klipspringer. Still trying to stem all the leaks from above the water line, and slowing getting the boat dry. Have not tried the plug around the engine yet and so have a lot of washing machine noise and of course drag. Still trying to work out the best arrangement for the engine. It is quite difficult taking it into the cabin every trip. I will probably end up lifting it out and securing in the some way to the traveller and covering with a sheet. My spare engine is in one of the quarter berths. I found that the engines do not fit into the space under the cockpit sole, unless you are prepared to turn the engines on their sides - not recommended evn with 2 stroke. Not missing the sprayhood yet and the view forward is fantastic and access to the mast from the cabin steps is a real bonus.
busy home [deleted] 7 years ago
Why not on their sides?
I ve stored the Johnson 5 the Merc 4 the tohatsu 8. on their sides (as recommed in the manuals) the right side up. No problems.
Glad klipspringer is going well,,
Skykomish E29 Posted 7 years ago. Edited by Skykomish E29 (member) 7 years ago
I agree Ron, in fact the locker under the cockpit was designed just for that. I understood that the only ones you have to be careful of are 4 strokes due to the sump full of oil. You have to ensure that they are laid on the correct side as per the manual, not all lay on the same side. And I understand that you have to ensure that the power head is higher than the prop.
But glad that you are enjoying the boat.
Mike A1 7 years ago
Congratulations - you must be very pleased to be out sailing on Klipspringer at last. Plenty ot time to do all the remaining jobs later.

I usually drop the sprayhood for the reasons you said (unless it's raining!) and I think that an Achilles looks better that way.
Skykomish E29 7 years ago
I agree Mike we have found that the sprayhood on Skykomish really is a pain in respect of visibility and now have it down when out in her
rothwell_neil 7 years ago
Honda designed to be stored on its side and has lugs to rest on, but only on one side to avoid oil spill. Sprayhood down on Emily when weather is nice, up when wet from the heavens or the front.
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NormanKlipspringer 7 years ago
I obviously missed that bit in the manual about laying down on side. I think that will make life easier since I have both engines stored in the cabin when not in use. Thanks to all for pointing this out. Planning a trip out to tenby on Saturday, although I doubt I will get that far given the forecst winds (or lack of). May end up fishing.
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NormanKlipspringer Posted 7 years ago. Edited by NormanKlipspringer (admin) 7 years ago
Boat now going well. Auxiallary engine now stored in lazerette and main engine lifted out after use with aid of mainsheet. I have not yet sorted out the use of the various plugs for the engine well.
Continue to refurbish the inside - varnish, hooks etc.
I have now resolved my problem with the two NMEA outputs to the radio. I have discovered that it is not a good idea to just connect the two outputs in Parallel. I was getting some unpredictable outcomes, but also there is a danger of damage to the internal circuits. I have solved the problem by wiring a toggle switch on the +ve NMEA outputs of the chartplotters. This allows me to select either chartplotter to drive the Dsc radio or the tiller pilot. This works fine with no unexpected outcomes.
Having studied my outboard manauls again - there is no mention of being able to store them in any other position than on their backs with the handle upper most - hence my original actions.
Hoisted my cruising chute for the first time in lights winds and very pleased. I have yet to try my spinnaker (bought on Ebay).
I think I have at long last cured the leaks from above.
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NormanKlipspringer 6 years ago
I have bought on ebay an EasyAIS & Easysplit. This allows the vhf aerial to be split without sunstantial loss, and the EasyAIS gives AIS output to my Garmin GPSMap450 chartplotter over NMEA. The outcome of these 2 black boxes is that all vessels over 300 tonnes and any others with AIS transponders are shown on my chartplotter. I can then click on the boat and see name, call sign, MMSI number, direction, speed, rate of turn and whether it will, if my course and its course remain constant, enter my 'risk of collision' area which I have predetermined. Amazinglingly I can pick up boats over 25nm away.
I have decided to change outboard engines. The current one, which came with the boat, is a Tohatsu 8hp 2 stroke standard shaft with electric start. This works fine but being standard shaft the prop is only just out side the well and the engine sits low in the boat so that to remove it I have to remove the cockpit flooring to undo the toggles on the clamping bolts. The electric start is a bit of a luxury. the other problem on this early engine (2000) is that the exhaust exits the engine through holes in the shaft about 2inches above the cavitation plate and this is well up on the well, so all the exhaust comes into the cockpit. I did think of replacing it with a four stroke 8hp but was amazed at the size difference and extra weight (10KG). It will not fit into the well. I have decided to go with a Tohatsu 6hp ul sailpro. This has the extra long shaft so that I can raise the engine in the cockpit, while at the same time ensuring that the prop sits well out from the boat. It does of course have through prop exhaust and as a bonus has gear change on the front of the engine. I will let you know how I get on.
I am still upgrading the inside of the boat. Thought I had cured all the leaks, but found another today - looks like one of the stantion bases. I have my cushions altered to fit the revised accommodation, but until I am completely happy that the boat is dry I am reluctant to carpet and curtain. I will take pictures when I do.
Very pleased with the sailing performance. Seems to be slightly faster than Archimedes. This may be due to the rig being tuned better or it might be imagination.
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NormanKlipspringer 6 years ago
I have now refitted the windows and am well pleased. For details have a look at the following link where I have added my procedure.
www.flickr.com/groups/achilles24/discuss/72157623136994756/
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NormanKlipspringer Posted 6 years ago. Edited by NormanKlipspringer (admin) 6 years ago
Klipspringer had so many leaks it was difficult to fix them all. An advantage of the wet weather is that I have been able to repeatedly go into the boat when it is raining and see where the water is coming in. I have fixed leaks in the following:
mooring cleats (fore and aft)
cheek blocks
stanchions
genoa tracks
window seals
window screws
u bolts through deck
through deck fixing screws for bulkheads (non standard)
shroud u bolts
bolts holding wooden battons on top of bridge deck
I have probably forgotten something in the above list. Basically it was like a sieve.
busy home [deleted] 6 years ago
Where the horse goes through the deck?
Loose screws/rivets in piano hinges on cockpit seats?
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NormanKlipspringer 6 years ago
On Archimedes yes but on Klipspringer strangely - no leaks in these areas Ron.
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NormanKlipspringer Posted 6 years ago. Edited by NormanKlipspringer (admin) 6 years ago
I am grateful to Alan Jones (Super Snoopy) for the engine plug he gave me:
Well thingy
This was much better than that which I had with the boat. I have stripped off the old timber and replaced with new while at the same time raising the height so the engine sits higher in the cockpit (new engine Tohatsu 6hp Sailpro UL). I also added some wings so that the plug can be secured by stainless bolts to the side of the cockpit to stop the plug rising when under load.
P1010001
This shows the new plug.
P1010002This shows the plug plus a block encased in rubber to act as a forard stop against which the engine leg presses when under load in forward gear.
P1010003
This shows the plug in the boat ready to receive the engine.
P1010004
This shows the engine in situ. Note the webbing support which I use on the mainsail halyard to raise and lower the engine to save my back.
The new engine has the gear change lever on the front of the engine which makes changing much easier. The throttle control arm is also longer. It was much easier coming in to my pontoon yesterday to juggle throttle, gear and have a my mooring rope ready.
Well pleased.
Incidently the timber I used came in part from a section of rudder I cut down for a friend, and also from the bench in a school laboratory, after they had finished with it I add. This is my contribution to recycling.
I didn't check where I was going to atore the engine plug when not in use. I assumed that it would fit into the lazerette. It does, just - very lucky.
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NormanKlipspringer Posted 6 years ago. Edited by NormanKlipspringer (admin) 6 years ago
Refiting continued. Out of the water for annual maintenance. See my comments on the rudder in the discussion www.flickr.com/groups/achilles24/discuss/7215763169626049...
I am currently removing redundant skin fittings. Two from logs that are no longer in use and I left in the boat when I first launched 2 years ago. One from the sink which I removed at the initial refit but only capped, and two from the sea toilet ahich I have decommissioned and plan to use a portapotty. I will let you know how I get on. I also plan to straiten one of my spreaders which has been annoying me since I have had the boat and this is my first real opportunity to fix it.
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NormanKlipspringer 6 years ago
Boat back in the water. Used MAS resin and hardner as recommended by PBO for the through hull holes. Very good. Only hole now is the well for the outboard. Managed to sort out the spreader. NASA were very good and quick at repairing my wind sensor. They replaced the lower bearing, fitted wind cups which I supplied and supplied me with new 20m cable. Total bill £36 including £8.50 postage.
About to go down the harbour and put the mast up.
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