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Whipper_snapper ADMIN September 9, 2010
Please note we are still getting 'off topic' pictures posted. Your pictures are great but the Boeing B-17 and the Avro Lancaster are well outside our remit. The Lancaster passes ONLY if appearing with the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight - not while flying alone.

Group Description

A group for images (including paintings and press cuttings, songs, speeches, poems and film clips) and comments from anyone interested in the events that occurred over Britain, the English Channel and France beginning 10 July 1940 and ending 31 Oct 1940, generally known as The Battle of Britain and the Blitz beginning 7 September 1940 and ending 10 May 1941.

The group welcomes images referencing any of the participant nationalities - of which there were many. Please post images of places, comments, personalities like Park, Leigh-Mallory, Dowding and fliers like Tuck, Bader and Hillary, as well as Polish, Canadian, French, Czeck, South African and other RAF fliers and ground staff, as well as members of the Luftwaffe and their commanders and the political leaders involved. Operation Sealion, the German plan for the invasion of Britain, postponed indefiinitely on 17 September 1940, is included along with raids by British planes on Channel Ports aimed at disrupting invasion preparations. Please also include images relating to the Blitz which followed as for many, especially at the time, the Battle of Britain merged into the Blitz making them an inseperable episode in the history of Britain during World War 2.

Please when posting consider this. The principal UK types of planes were:

Spitfire Mark I and Mark II. The Mark II was new but a few flew. One survivor of the Battle still flies today.

Hurricane Mark I and IIa.

Bolton-Paul Defiant turret fighter - first by day and then by night.

Fighter and bomber versions of the Blenheim.

RAF and Fleet Air Arm Gloster Gladiator biplanes fighters. (Eric Brown recalls he made a failed attack on a Heinkel using a Gladiator. The Heinkel outran him and he could not make a second pass because the Gladiatot was too slow.)

Fleet Air Arm types such as the Blackburn Skua and Roc would have been available in the event of invasion, as well as Fairey Swordfish torpedo bombers.

Army Co-Operation aircraft like Westland Lysanders were fitted as light bombers in the event of invasion.

Bomber Command used Blenheims, Whitleys and Wellingtons were used to bomb the German barges being gathered in the invasion ports. Avro Ansons were used by Coastal Command until better aircraft became available. Coastal Command also had Blenheims.


Principal Luftwaffe types were:

Messerschmitt Bf 109 E (Emil)

Messerschmitt Bf 110 C (Caesar)

Heinkel He 111

Junkers 87 Stuka

Junkers 88 fast bomber

Junkers 52/3m transport

Dornier 17z and (I think) a few Dornier 215 which were the export version of the 17 originally intended for Sweden but then taken by the Luftwaffe.

Heinkel 59 float planes were operational over The Channel as Air-Sea Rescue but the RAF refused to grant them free flight and some were attacked and shot down despite Red Cross markings. The RAF suspected them of passing information and carrying out recce.

The Italian Air Force also flew in the latter stages of the BoB - from Belgium - and they used BR20 bombers and Fiat CR42 biplane fighters. Several of both types were shot down over Essex and Suffolk in October 1940 before the Italians went over to night operations. The CR42 biplane in the RAF Museum was shot down during that period and landed almost intact in Suffolk. It was similar to a Gloster Gladiator but more lightly armed. (Thanks to co-administrator Whipper-Snapper for these details)

Another co-administrator, Maximum 'Gee', has also suggested including any images that 'evoke thoughts of the era, such as the silhouette of a later mark Spitfire or Hurricane, that can't easily be discerned as such, but immediately makes the viewer think of the B of B. (as long as it clearly evokes those thoughts).' I agree. Maximum 'Gee' also suggests that as a group we could include such evocative images as the famous 'Bobby' walking past the German soldiers in Guernsey, which he suggests would make the viewer think of what it would have been like had Britain lost the battle, and thus how much we owe those that defended the UK from invasion. I also agree with this.

images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://newsimg.bbc.co.u...

Please don't be offended if we tighten up on the categories but we are learning as we go along, me especially. So do your best only to post images of aircraft that were part of the conflict but we will be also be pleased with images that evoke the conflict without doing injustice to accuracy. We'll arrive at a consensus about this as we proceed so there'll be no brutal use of the delete button.

I'm inclined for example to use some latitude when posting images from the film 'Battle of Britain' and other historic re-enactments but the main idea is to collect a more comprehensive and authentic archive than what's presently available on Flickr. Watch out for copyright of archive material but it would be good if we could use film material, for example:

video.aol.com/video-detail/battle-of-britain-newsreels/35...

and Churchill speaking the British House of Commons on 4 June 1940 - a 10 minute composite of sound and stills - considered by some his greatest speech:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=6llT2ZYg-4E&feature=related

Links: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Britain
www.raf.mod.uk/Bob1940/bobhome.html
As many will know, the phrase 'Battle of Britain' was from Winston Churchill's speech (see reference above) to a packed the House of Commons on 18 June 1940 "The Battle of France is over. I expect the Battle of Britain is about to begin."

www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjIqE0Mh3Ak&feature=related

The reference to 'The Few' is also from Churchill who famously said in the Commons on 20 August 1940 "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."

www.winstonchurchill.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=420

www.fiftiesweb.com/usa/churchill-so-many.mp3

Yes and poems (see text below this memorial window)

www.flickr.com/photos/norfolkodyssey/263656742/in/pool-32...

or John Pudney, commissioned into the RAF as an intelligence officer and as a member of the Air Ministry's Creative Writer's Unit, who wrote the famous ode to British airmen - "For Johnny."

www.poetry-online.org/pudnam_for_johnny.htm

Do not despair
For Johnny-head-in-air;
He sleeps as sound
As Johnny underground.
Fetch out no shroud
For Johnny-in-the-cloud;
And keep your tears
For him in after years.

Better by far
For Johnny-the-bright-star,
To keep your head,
And see his children fed.

Additional Info

  • This group will count toward the photo's limit (60 for Pro members, 30 for free members)
  • Members can post 15 things to the pool each day.
  • Accepted content types: Photos, Videos, Images, Art, Screenshots
  • Accepted safety levels: Safe
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